Last updated June 8, 2016
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Copyrights & Permissions

NASW Press's printed, electronic, and audiovisual materials, including the NASW Code of Ethics and the NASW Standards, may not be republished, reprinted, or distributed without written permission from or contractual agreement with the Press.

Requests for Permission to Use NASW Books, Social Work Abstracts, Professional Standards, and Audiovisual Materials: The NASW Press will grant permission to use copyrighted material from all NASW books, Social Work Abstracts, professional standards, and audiovisual materials. Include in your written request for permission the book, Social Work Abstracts, or DVD title and the chapter or article title(s) that you are interested in; volume, issue, and page numbers; copyright year; the purpose of the requested use; number of photocopies you plan to make; and the name and address of your publisher if you intend to publish.

Please contact the Copyright Clearance Center to obtain permissions for business or academic use for all NASW books, Social Work Abstracts, professional standards, and audiovisual materials:

Copyright Clearance Center
www.copyright.com
Phone: 978-750-8400
Fax: 978-646-8600
E-mail: info@copyright.com

Requests for Permission to Use Social Work, Social Work Research, Health & Social Work, and Children & Schools Materials: Permissions to use copyrighted material from the NASW Press journals Social Work, Social Work Research, Health & Social Work, and Children & Schools should be directed to Oxford University Press.

Fair Use: In accordance with industry standards, authors may use excerpts from NASW Press books of up to 300 words, except for figures or tables, without requesting formal permission or paying fees. Full attribution is expected. Tables and figures may not be reprinted without express permission. Excerpts from the Encyclopedia of Social Work can be up to 700 words.

In accordance with the Fair Use Section of the Copyright Act of 1976, permission will be granted to photocopy articles or abstracts from NASW Press journals for one-time use for the purpose of research, scholarship, training, professional development, and education without payment of a fee. This provision includes one-time use of multiple copies in classrooms, agencies, or for distribution at a seminar. For photocopying requests regarding NASW Press journals, see the Requests for Permission sections above.

Republishing: NASW Press frequently receives requests to republish articles from its journals in formal books. Such permission is generally granted, contingent on agreement from the author and payment of a fee. If the author does not agree to having the article republished in a book, the NASW Press will not grant permission. For republishing requests regarding NASW Press journals, see the Requests for Permission sections above.

Reprinting: Contracts with copy houses permit copying without prior consent from journal articles only. Permissions for reprinting any portion of an NASW Press book or the Encyclopedia of Social Work must be requested on an individual basis.

Permissions Exceptions: NASW Press cannot grant permission for the use of abstracts from Social Work Abstracts, in print or electronic form. Permission can be granted for the use of abstracts published in the NASW Press journals, Social Work, Social Work Research, Health & Social Work, and Children & Schools. For abstracts requests regarding NASW Press journals, see the Requests for Permission sections above.

Do You Need Permission?

Generally, you must seek permission to use the following:

  • all cartoons, artwork, photographs, or audiovisual material
  • any table or figure
  • all newspaper articles
  • even a single line of music or poetry
  • a quotation that is 10 percent or more of the original work
  • any quotation of 300 words or more.

Request permission from the copyright holder, who usually is the publisher. Obtaining permission to use materials often requires several weeks; therefore, you should seek permission early. Requesting and obtaining permission to use materials is solely the responsibility of the author, not the publisher.

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